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Paper Cutting

Paper Cutting

Paper-cutting
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Paper-cutting is one of China's most popular folk arts. Archaeological finds trace the tradition back to the 6th century; it is supposed that the beginning of paper-cutting is even a few centuries earlier. Paper-cuttings are used for religious purposes, for decoration and cialis professional indian as patterns.

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In Shanxi and Shaanxi provinces, almost every home is decorated with paper-cuts on the windows and doors. They also ornament walls, windows, doors, columns, mirrors, lamps and lanterns in homes and are used for decoration on presents or are given as presents themselves.

They have special significance at festivals and on holidays. To get rid of the ionic-balance.com old and bring good luck, every household puts up papercuts on the newly plastered window paper on the eve of Spring Festival.

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Chinese farmers still have the tradition of arranging farm production according to the lunar calendar. They number the years with twelve symbolic animals: the rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and http://ideal-cornell.com/index.php/fda-approved-viagra-paypal/ boar. So the paper-cuts of the twelve animals are indispensable.

Paper-cuttings also used to be used as patterns, especially for embroidery and lacquer work.

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Paper-cuttings are not produced by machine, but by hand. Paper-cuts are done all over China, but are different in the method in different areas. There are two methods of making paper-cuts: scissors cuttings and knife cuttings. As the name indicates, scissors cuttings are fashioned with scissors. Several pieces of paper--up to eight pieces--are fastened together. The motif is then cut with sharp, pointed scissors.

Knife cuttings are fashioned by putting several layers of paper on a relatively soft foundation consisting of a mixture of tallow and ashes. Following a pattern, the artist cuts the motif into the paper with a sharp knife which he usually holds vertically. The advantage of knife cuttings is that considerably more paper-cuttings can be made in one operation than with scissor cuttings.

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Before, paper-cuts are usually made only by women and girls. They use scissors and paper to cut all kinds of pictures such as pomegranates, lotuses, peach blossoms, mice, fighting roosters and rabbits eating carrots.

This used to be one of the crafts that every girl was to master and we use it compare cialis prices online that were often used to judge brides. Professional paper-cutting artists are, on the other hand, almost always men who have guaranteed incomes and work together in workshops.

 

Find more about Chinese paper-cutting:

  • Chinavoc. "[www.chinavoc.com/arts/folk/papercut.htm Chinavoc]." Artistic Creations from Nimble fingers. Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  • Needham, Joseph. Chemistry and Chemical Technology. [1974] (1974). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521086906
  • http://www.chinaartworld.com.cn/

 

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Chinese paper cutting

Chinese paper cutting is a unique artform and has existed for thousands of years with a long history featuring both national and regional themes. Paper began as a precious commodity in the Han Dynasty. Most of the people with access to paper for an entertainment cause such as art were usually nobles in royal palaces[1]. The Song Dynasty scholar Chou Mi mentioned several paper cutters who cut paper with scissors into a great variety of designs and characters in different styles, and a young man who could even cut characters and flowers inside his sleeve. The oldest surviving paper cut out is a symmetrical circle from the levitra for women 6th century found in Xinjiang, China.

From the 7th to 13th century, paper cutting became popular especially during Chinese holiday festivals. The art spread to the rest of the world in the 14th century. Throughout the Qing Dynasty many papercutting skills were developed including drafting and cheap cialis 50mg the best choice the use of smoked papers. By the end of the Chinese paper cutting is a unique artform and has existed for thousands of years with a long history featuring both national and regional themes. Paper began as a precious commodity in the Han Dynasty. Most of the people with access to paper for an entertainment cause such as art were usually nobles in royal palaces[. The Song Dynasty scholar Chou Mi mentioned several paper cutters who cut paper with scissors into a great variety of designs and characters in different styles, and a young man who could even cut characters and flowers inside his sleeve. The oldest surviving paper cut out is a symmetrical circle from the 6th century found in Xinjiang, China.

From the 7th to 13th century, paper cutting became popular especially during Chinese holiday festivals. The art spread to the rest of the world in the 14th century. Throughout the Qing Dynasty many papercutting skills were developed including drafting and the use of smoked papers. By the end of the Qing ruling however, new art forms were being introduced. The Republic of China later tried to revive the art in the 1980s.

In the rural countryside in mainland China, papercutting is a traditionally female activity. In the past, every girl was expected to master it and brides were often judged by their skill. Professional papercutting artists are, on the other hand, usually male and have guaranteed incomes and work together in workshops.

Qing ruling however, new art forms were being introduced. The Republic of China later tried to revive the art in the 1980s.

In the rural countryside in mainland China, papercutting is a traditionally female activity. In the past, every girl was expected to master it and brides were often judged by their skill. Professional papercutting artists are, on the other hand, usually male and have guaranteed incomes and work together in workshops.

(More from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Paper_Cutting )

Paper Cutting

Paper was invented in China 2000 years ago.

The art of paper cutting in China began during the Tang Dynasty (618-906 C.E.).

• Paper cuts were used as decorations for gifts and especially on holidays.

• In old China, houses in the North had windows made of thin paper coated with tung oil to make them transparent. Red paper cutouts were pasted on the windows to add color to the home.

• Paper cuts were once used as stencils for pottery and as guides for wood carvers.

• Paper cutting was also one step in the process of embroidery.

The pattern could be cut freehand with scissors; Sometimes several simple patterns were cut at once; however, the more complicated designs were cut one at a time. Knives, gouges, punches and needles were used for these designs. The cutout was then pasted onto the material (silk in old China) and embroidered over.

• Traditional subjects were flowers, mythical and real animals, characters which meant "Good Luck" or "Happiness" or Scenes from a folk tale.

• Modern motifs include subjects of social significance-minority people, health care and generic online viagra just try! education as well as the more traditional themes.

• The process has remained the same throughout the centuries and people in China today continue to enjoy colorful paper cuts.

Making a Paper Cut:

There are two ways to cut your design:

1. One is to cut with the paper folded in half; this will give you a symmetrical pattern. Two examples of designs cut using this method are found below.

2. The other method is to draw a rough sketch of the figure on the back of the paper and to then cut it out without any folding. An example of this is below also.

(More from: http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/elementary_resources/china/paper_cutting.pdf )